Course Descriptions

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For general academic information, consult the CAJ High School Student Handbook

Typical basic schedules: see graduation requirements

  1. 9th: Bible and PE/Health, English, math, physical science, World History, and study hall
  2. 10th: Bible and PE/Health, English: World Literature, language, math, biology, study hall and 1 elective per semester
  3. 11th: Bible and PE/Health, English: American Literature, American history, study hall and electives
  4. 12th: Bible and PE/Health, English: British Literature, Japanese Culture/Global Issues, study hall and electives.


Contents

Art

Introduction to Art I

1 semester
This course is an introduction to basic concepts and media in the visual arts as well as a survey of Western art history from classical Greece to the Renaissance. Students will explore the elements of art, discover the ideas and characteristics that make art last through time, be able to judge an artwork’s quality, as well as engage in the process of art-making, and learn to apply biblical principles to art. A field trip to a local art museum may be included in the course.

Introduction to Art II

1 semester
This course is an introduction to basic concepts and media in the visual arts as well as a survey of art history from the Renaissance to the Twentieth Century. Students will explore the principles of design, discover the ideas and characteristics that make art last through time, be able to judge an artwork’s quality, as well as engage in the process of art-making, and learn to apply biblical principles to art. A field trip to a local art museum may be included in the course.

Ceramics

1 semester
This course if designed to offer students an opportunity to explore ceramic media and processes. Students will learn basic skills in hand-building, working on the potters wheel and creating a variety of surface designs. The course also includes a look at some of the scientific and cultural aspects of ceramics, and connections between creation and Creator.
Prerequisite: 1 semester of art or instructor approval.

Drawing and Painting

1 semester
This course is an exploration of two dimensional design. Students will discover the aesthetic qualities that make drawing and painting interesting, create their own works in various drawing and painting media, and be able to evaluate the success of their own work and the work of others. The course will also include highlights from art history and a look at the ties between art and faith.
Prerequisite: 1 semester of art or instructor approval.

Sculpture

1 semester
This course is an exploration of three-dimensional design. Students will discover the aesthetic qualities that make sculpture interesting, create their own sculptures in various media, and be able to evaluate the success of their work. The course will also include highlights from the history of three dimensional form, and connections between creation and the Creator.
Prerequisite: 1 semester of art or instructor approval.

Senior Art

1 or 2 semesters
This one semester class is designed to allow 12th grade students who have taken one or more high school art classes to explore a particular artistic medium or area of interest in greater depth, and to prepare seniors for the more independent initiative required of serious art students in a college setting. The class includes independent study in art history and weekly discussions on selected readings from Madeleine L’Engle, Francis Schaeffer, H.R. Rookmaaker and other sources that relate art and faith.
Prerequisite: 1 semester of art or instructor approval.

Bible

Bible 9: The Bible and World Religions

1 semester spread across the school year
Students will learn about world religions within the context of evangelism and God’s truth. The course includes an inductive Bible study of I John, a study of Eternity in Their Hearts, and evaluation of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam from a Christian perspective. Students will consider the following questions: Does absolute truth exist? Does intolerance = mercy? Can you be sincerely mistaken?, How shall we then live? Students will discuss topics, complete projects, and do word studies.
Texts: NIV Study Bible, Religions for Today (Stanley Thornes, 1991), and Eternity in Their Hearts.

Bible 10: Developing a Christian Worldview

1 semester spread across the school year
Every year Student are assisted in developing and articulating a Christian world view in three ways: first, to gain a deeper understanding of biblical answers to life’s basic questions through a study of Christian doctrine; second, to evaluate modern and post modern views in light of Scripture; and third, to apply a biblical world view to their life right now. Students will grapple with questions such as Is there a God?, Does truth exist?, Who am I?, Where am I?, What is the problem?, and What is the solution? Students will discuss topics, write critique papers, complete projects, and do word studies.
Texts: NIV Study Bible, Exploring Apologetics (CSI, 1992).

Bible 11: Disciplines of the Christian Disciple

1 semester spread across the school year
Students will learn how definitions of discipleship have changed throughout history, complete an inductive study of James, evaluate the role of the spiritual disciplines in the life of a disciple, and discuss challenges and temptations faced by disciples. Students will complete journal entries, group presentations, and Scripture memorization.
Texts: NIV Study Bible, Faith and Discipleship (CSI 1992), Screwtape Letters, Celebration of Discipline.

Bible 12: Ethics

1 semester spread across the school year
Students will develop an understanding of biblical principles, use the 10 Commandments and the Sermon on the Mount to develop an ethical framework, and apply this understanding to real life situations in connection with social studies. As students consider how they should live as a moral person in an immoral world, students will write essays applying biblical issues to contemporary issues and develop a personal mission statement.
Texts: NIV Study Bible, Exploring Ethics (CSI, 1992), Bumper Sticker Ethics (IVP), and Decisions (CRC Publications).

Computer

Video Production

1 semester, First & Second Semester
In this introduction, intermediate and advanced levels to digital video, students will learn camcorder shooting tips, video capturing techniques, video editing, and exporting video to different forms of media for presenting final projects to a group of people. Projects include making a documentary, music video, and short stories. Software applications include: iTunes, iMovie, iDvd, Final Cut Express and StoryBoardOSX from AtomicLearning.com.

Digital Photography

First Semester
In this introduction to digital photography, students will learn to capture photos using a digital camera, and photo editing techniques on a computer, and printing. Students will create their own slideshows, using photos that they have taken themselves demonstrating at least 10 different compositional concepts along with brief descriptions of each concept. Students photos may be selected to be used for the yearbook as well as other school publications and the school website.
Software applications include: iTunes, iPhoto, iMovie, and Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe Bridge.

Digital Photography and the Graphic Arts

Second Semester
Students will learn to capture photos using a digital camera; editing photo techniques and printing. The main emphasis in this class is to learn how to manipulate photos and original drawings in a photo editing software or illustration software to create various effects that can be used in a variety of situations such as web pages or in print. Student photos may be selected to be used for the yearbook as well as other school publications and the school website.
Software applications include: Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Bridge, Adobe Illustrator.

Yearbook Journalism

First & Second Semester
Students participate in an intense study in basic design, typographic principals, digital photographic editing, and caption writing, using professional software applications used in magazine layout production. Students must be self-motivated. Software applications include: Adobe Photoshop, Adobe InDesign, and Adobe Bridge.

Computers and Computer Programming

1 Semester spread across the school year
Students learn database design, computer hardware, networking and programming. In the database design unit, students use FileMaker Pro and MySQL to design databases. Students study the interoperation of the operating system and hardware in the hardware unit. In the Networking unit students study how data moves from computer to computer and how that data is interpreted by the computer. Students study procedural and object-oriented programming and work on individual projects.

English

English 9 (integrated with History 9)

2 semesters
An introduction to history and literature as means by which people make sense of the world around them. Scope is prodigious: prehistoric to present. We will create specific thematic and cultural focuses, choosing to seek truth as God sees it and to study both literature and history as Art. Students focus on reading, writing, thinking and speaking through collaboration, analysis, reflection and response. Intentional integration of the two disciplines will provide a better understanding of literature, art and history within a specific cultural and ideological context.
Texts include ANCIENT WORLD HISTORY, Patterns of Interaction, 2003 , MODERN WORLD HISTORY, Patterns of Interaction, 2003 How Grammar Works: A Self-Teaching Guide, To Kill A Mockingbird, Lord of the Flies, Romeo and Juliet, Fahrenheit 451,

English 10

2 semesters
A survey of world literature emphasizing voices from countries other than the US and Great Britain and how people from many cultures have wrestled with the following significant questions: “Who am I?”, “Who is my neighbor?”, “What is wrong with the world?”, and “What is the significance of words?”. Special effort is made to incorporate works from every country represented in the class. Units incorporate composition, vocabulary, and literary analysis. Students will complete an independent study of grammar, give presentations, write in journals, analyze and respond to literature, take tests and quizzes, and write a research-based worldview perspective paper.
Texts include Cry the Beloved Country, Night, A Doll’s House, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

11th grade American Humanities

2 semesters
A thematic survey of American history and literature, covering themes such as American identity, foreign policy, voting and minority rights, economics and stewardship, technology and civil rights. Students will learn how literature reflects and affects historical developments in a thematic progression, especially as it concerns the nature of the American dream and the "hyphen-American" experience. Students will give presentations, study and use rhetoric, write both analytical and creative pieces, research and compose a secondary source author paper and participate in online and in class discussions.
Texts include The Crucible, Huckleberry Finn, The Great Gatsby, Raisin in the Sun, Death of a Salesman, Obasan and Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.
:AP English Language component: students may choose to participate in the additional work of preparing for the AP Language test, working through essays of synthesis, rhetorical analysis and argumentation, as well as reading strategies for fiction and non-fiction materials and evaluating prose and poetry for rhetorical effect. This preparation requires at least two additional hours of homework per week. Prerequisite: successful application to take the AP class.

English 11

2 semesters
A chronological survey of American literature from the pre-colonial era to the present. Students explore the ideological progression of literature through the origins of humanity's search for meaning, the rhetoric of revolution, the search for equality, the struggle with hope and despair, the rhetoric of frontiers and novelty, the nature of the tragic hero and the nature of the American dream. Students will give presentations, study and use rhetoric, write both analytical and creative pieces, research and compose a secondary source author paper and participate in online and in class discussions. Texts include The Crucible, Huckleberry Finn, The Great Gatsby, Raisin in the Sun, Death of a Salesman, and Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.

AP English Language component: students may choose to participate in the additional work of preparing for the AP Language test, working through essays of synthesis, rhetorical analysis and argumentation, as well as reading strategies for fiction and non-fiction materials and evaluating prose and poetry for rhetorical effect. This preparation requires at least two additional hours of homework per week. Prerequisite: successful application to take the AP class.

English 12

2 semesters
A question driven study of European culture from the medieval to the postmodern, focusing on British literature, seeking to understand man's search for meaning through a foundation of good and a struggle through evil and suffering. Students will read, write, think, research and speak in order to reflect, evaluate and synthesize their learning. The course is organized by units, each of which is comprised of a major polished paper, several timed essays, novel, short story and poetry reading, as well as a major presentation and a literary terms test.
Major texts include: Beowulf, Canterbury Tales, Murder in the Cathedral, Macbeth, Hamlet, Great Divorce, Frankenstein, Brave New World, 1984 and one or two contemporary British novels, renewed each year.

AP English Literature:In addition to the above curriculum, students will work through AP reading lists, write essays of poetry and prose analysis and open literary critique, as well as evaluating poetry and prose reading in multiple choice questions. This preparation requires at least two additional hours of homework per week. Prerequisite: successful application to take the AP class.

EAL (ESL): Effective Reading and Writing (9th and 10th, possible 11th)

2 semesters
Students focus on improving their writing skills in terms of ideas and content, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, and conventions. Students complete writing exercises and use the writing process to write essays.

Home Economics

Home Economics I and 2 (repeatable)

1 semester
Students will be provided an opportunity to explore: the nature of food, nutrition, food management, safety, sanitation and equipment, preparation and presentation of food, consumerism/food selection, multicultural aspects of food, food and ecology and how to create a personalized cookbook. Parallel with food preparation studies, the student will have an opportunity to study the basics of sewing (hand and machine), crocheting, knitting, quilting and other related crafts. Having mastered an adequate level of skills in these areas, students will be given opportunities to serve one another and their community.

Industrial Arts

Industrial Arts I

2 semesters (not required to be sequential)
This is a course designed for the student to gain a working knowledge of woodworking with hand and power tools. The students will be introduced to the basic concepts of woodworking such as how to plan a project, read an existing plan, measure and cut a piece accurately, use common hand and power tools. Scrollwork is the preferred project type. The students build small projects in the process of learning these introductory skills.
Text: Tage Frid Teaches Woodworking: A step-by-step guidebook to essential woodworking techniques by Tage Frid (Oct 1, 1994)

Industrial Arts II

2 semesters (not required to be sequential)
This course will build upon the basics introduced in IA I. The students will work on their individual projects using various hand and power tools. Each student must select a woodworking specialty on which s/he would like to focus such as: scrollwork, turning [lathe], bandsaw, whittling, intarsia, etc.
Prerequisite: two semesters of Industrial Arts I or the equivalent as determined by the instructor
Text: Tage Frid Teaches Woodworking: A step-by-step guidebook to essential woodworking techniques by Tage Frid (Oct 1, 1994)

Industrial Arts III (offered when possible)

2 semesters (not required to be sequential)
This is a course designed to allow the student to move on from the basics and fundamentals introduced in IA I and II to the higher skills of woodworking. Each student must select a woodworking specialty on which s/he would like to focus such as: scrollwork, turning [lathe], band-saw, whittling, intarsia, etc.
Pre-requisites: two semesters of IA II or the equivalent as determined by the instructor
Text: Tage Frid Teaches Woodworking: A step-by-step guidebook to essential woodworking techniques by Tage Frid (Oct 1, 1994)

Industrial Arts IV (offered when possible)

2 semesters (not required to be sequential)
Content students study: This is course is designed to give the student an opportunity to develop his/her skill as a woodworker beyond IA I, II, and III. Each student must select a woodworking specialty on which s/he would like to focus such as: scrollwork, turning [lathe], band-saw, whittling, intarsia, etc.
Pre-requisites: two semesters of IA III or the equivalent as determined by the instructor
Text: Tage Frid Teaches Woodworking: A step-by-step guidebook to essential woodworking techniques by Tage Frid (Oct 1, 1994)

Math

Algebra I (Grades 8 or 9 – High School credit only if taken in 9th grade)

2 semesters A basic course in first level algebra. Topics studied include open sentences, systems of equations, graphing of linear functions, polynomials, factoring, algebraic fractions, exponents, radicals, quadratic conditions, absolute values, and practical applications. A graphing calculator is required.
Entry skills / Prerequisite: Basic math, including addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, as well as, fractions, percents, decimals, whole numbers and ratios, and successful completion of a Pre-Algebra course recommended
TEXT: UCSMP Algebra (Scott Foresman/Addison Wesley, 1998)

Geometry — grade 9 or 10

2 Semesters
Geometry is the study of visual patterns. In this course mathematical observation skills are sharpened by recognizing and analyzing these patterns as they relate to the shape and size of objects, both physical and theoretical. This course also includes an introduction to logic and proofs.
The student will continue to learn more about two and three diamentional shapes build on their algebraic base. Mathematical thinking is rigorous and different from much of the thinking used in our everyday lives. Problem solving and logical thinking skills will be strengthened by this class.
Entry skills / Prerequisites: Algebra 1
Text book: GEOMETRY –The University Chicago School Mathematic Project

Advanced Algebra (Grades 9 - 11)

2 Semesters
This is an advanced algebra course which includes number systems, review of linear sentences, polynomials, rational expressions; systems of sentences, introduction to functions, coordinate geometry, exponents; logarithms, trigonometry, conic sections; graphing calculator; and some theory of equations, sequences, probability, and statistics.
Entry skills / Prerequisite: Successful completion of a year of Geometry and Algebra 1 .
Text: Algebra 2 : Prentice Hall Mathematics (2009)

Precalculus — (grades 10 – 12)

2 semesters
Pre-calculus covers functions and graphs including polynomial, power and rational functions; Exponential, logistic and logarithmic functions; Trigonometric functions and identities; Discrete mathematics including sequences and probabilities. This course prepares students for Calculus.
Entry skills / Pre-requisite: Advanced Algebra
Text: Pre-calculus, Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic/Demana, Waits, Foley, Kennedy Addison Wesley(2006)

Calculus (Non AP and AP) (grades 11 – 12)

2 semesters
Non AP Calculus: This is for students who take Calculus but opt not to take the AP exam. The topics of study are the same as AP Calculus.
AP Calculus: This course prepares students for the AP Calculus exam in the spring. The study focuses on properties of functions: continuity, limits, differentiation and integration, volumes of solids of revolution. Students who complete the course satisfactorily should be adequately prepared to take the Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam.
Entry skills / Pre-requisite: Pre-Calculus

Calculus-BC (12 grade)

2 semesters
A second year Calculus AP course. In addition to the AB requirement also covers topics like partial fractions, integration by parts, Taylor and Maclaurin series and lengths of curves. Students who complete the course satisfactorily should be adequately prepared to take the Advanced Placement Calculus BC exam.
Entry skills / Prerequisite: Completion of Calculus (AB)
Student Text: Calculus Graphical, Numerical Algebraic

Music

Band: Concert Band

2 semesters
In this class, the student will rehearse and perform a higher level of music literature, as well as learn the advanced skills and techniques that are necessary to perform such music. The student will learn to play and cooperate in a team environment. The student will understand and appreciate his/her fellow classmates and the other instruments, as well as their own. Through class rehearsal and individual practice time, the student will build self-discipline on their instrument, which will lead to improved skill of the instrument, and will also transfer to other aspects of the students’ life. Through concerts and other public performances, the students will gain an understanding of music’s impact on and its relationship with the school, church, and community at large.

Band: Jazz Band

2 semesters
Students will learn about many of the vast styles that are grouped under the “Jazz” genre. These styles may include, but are not limited to: swing, rock, Latin, fusion, funk, blues, jazz ballads, samba, merengue, Afro-Cuban (6/8), and others. Also, time permitting, regional styles will be covered such as New Orleans Jazz, St. Louis Jazz, Chicago Jazz, etc. Students will learn to play and cooperate in a team environment. Since this is a multi-grade class, older and more experienced students will help and encourage younger students. Also, younger students will not be treated unfavorably due to their lack of experience. In a Jazz Ensemble, each person is vital to the ensemble and has something meaningful to contribute. Students in the CAJ Jazz Ensemble will be asked to practice above and beyond the requirements asked of students in the regular Band classes. Students will gain an understanding of music’s impact on and its relationship with the school, church, and community at large. Supplemental handouts and discussions will help to give students a biblical perspective on music, how students can worship the Lord with their instruments, and other topics.
Prerequisite Director’s approval

Band: Wind Ensemble (Pending staffing and interest)

2 semesters
In addition to the opportunities available in the Symphonic Winds, students in the Wind Ensemble will have the opportunity to cover a wider range of repertoire for their instrument in the form of solos, same-instrument ensembles (ensembles/consorts), and larger family ensembles such as brass, woodwind, percussion, or any combination therein. Members of the Wind Ensemble will have the opportunity to perform in venues that are not possible with a larger ensemble. Such possibilities may include, but are not limited to: Solo and Ensemble, Christmas Carols, churches and other venues, based on ability and time limitations of the class. A smaller class setting will allow students to go deeper into the music they rehearse and perform, which will in transfer into and further enrich the Symphonic Winds group.
Prerequisite Director’s approval

Band: Symphonic Winds/A Cappella Choir

2 credits/year This option is designed specifically for those students who would like to continue to develop both instrumental and vocal skills. These selected students will alternate between choir and band rehearsals, which will meet during the same period of the day. Students are expected to practice the material for both classes on their own time in addition to practice with the groups during the class period. Attendance at all performances, such as on-campus concerts and the KPASSP Choral festival, is mandatory.
Prerequisite: Band and Choir Directors’ Approval at the beginning of the school year.

Choral: A Cappella Choir

2 semesters
This course seeks to encourage the development of a lifelong love of singing. Areas of study will include basic vocal technique, the development of music reading skills including sight singing, and the performance of music literature with both sacred and secular texts ranging from the Renaissance through contemporary styles. Though the choir is a group activity every effort will be made to encourage poise, confidence, and musical artistry in each individual singer. Performance opportunities include three on-campus concerts, and the KPASSP Choral Festival. Attendance at all performances is mandatory. The student will cover expenses for performance outfits.
Prerequisite: An audition with the director may be arranged to determine the student’s vocal range and ability.

Choral: Chamber Singers

1 credit/year
This course is designed for singers from the A Cappella Choir who desire an accelerated program of learning, are independent learners, and are willing to spend time outside of the school day in rehearsal and performances. Since this course is one of the primary public ministry outreaches of Christian Academy in Japan, the nature of the singer’s Christian life is an important consideration for inclusion in the group. Literature includes music of the 16th to 21st centuries in sacred and secular styles, classical and contemporary church music, as well as music from the contemporary secular music scene. Performance opportunities, at which attendance is required, include on-campus concerts, outreach concerts for local churches, morning worship services and festivals. Chamber Singers rehearse two mornings per week; rehearsals are before school (7:25 AM), attendance is taken, and there may be extra rehearsals called as needed. Expenses for performance outfits will be covered by the student. Private vocal study is encouraged but not required.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in A Cappella Choir unless the student has a schedule conflict with a non-elective class. Open by audition to students in 10th grade and above.

Handbell Ensemble

1 credit/year
The CAJ Handbell Ensemble is one of the public ministry outreach groups of Christian Academy in Japan. The group rings five octaves of handbells and five and a half octaves of handchimes, sometimes includes other instruments (as needed and available), and occasionally utilizes student conductors. Ringing technique is taught in class, and musicianship is emphasized. Literature includes sacred and secular music written specifically for handbells, arrangements of hymns, praise songs, and other well-known songs, and transcriptions of classical pieces. Performance opportunities, at which attendance is required, include on-campus concerts, morning church services, and outreach concerts sponsored by area congregations. The CAJ Handbell Ensemble rehearses two mornings per week before school (7:20 to 8:15 AM), attendance is taken, and extra rehearsals may be scheduled as needed. Expenses for performance outfits and gloves for rehearsal are covered by the student.
Prerequisites: Group members are auditioned. No prior ringing experience is necessary. Ability to read music is not required, but helpful.

Orchestra: String Orchestra

2 semesters
Course open to students in grades 6 through 12 who are currently studying a string instrument at an intermediate level equivalent to a grade 3 or above of the ABRSM or Trinity examinations. Students will study music from a variety of styles and genres in preparation for concert performance. Students receive practical experience in string ensemble and orchestral playing. Only string students may register for Orchestra. Rehearsals include sectionals, chamber music, small groups and larger ensemble. The course includes the development of listening skills, music theory, and opportunities for student leadership such as student teaching or student conducting. The Orchestra performs at school concerts and church or community events.
Prerequisite: Director’s approval

Symphonic Winds/A Cappella Choir

2 credits/year This option is designed specifically for those students who would like to continue to develop both instrumental and vocal skills. These selected students will alternate between choir and band rehearsals, which will meet during the same period of the day. Students are expected to practice the material for both classes on their own time in addition to practice with the groups during the class period. Attendance at all performances, such as on-campus concerts and the KPASSP Choral festival, is mandatory.
Prerequisite: Band and Choir Directors’ Approval at the beginning of the school year.

Physical Education

PE/Health

(Required Course for 4 semesters of HS)
All students will be taking PE/Health each year they attend CAJ. In 9th grade the emphasis will be on physical fitness, the body systems, wellness, nutrition and first aid/CPR. In 10th and 11th grade a variety of lifetime sports and activities will be taught as well as an emphasis on mental and social health, substance abuse and sexuality. 12th grade will be a time to choose specific areas of sport interest and develop skills further as well as prepare for adult health issues and deepen health literacy.

Social Studies

History 9 (integrated with English 9)

2 semesters
An introduction to history and literature as means by which people make sense of the world around them. Scope is prodigious: prehistoric to present. We will create specific thematic and cultural focuses, choosing to seek truth as God sees it and to study both literature and history as Art. Students focus on reading, writing, thinking and speaking through collaboration, analysis, reflection and response. Intentional integration of the two disciplines will provide a better understanding of literature, art and history within a specific cultural and ideological context. <.br> Texts include Ancient World History, Patterns of Interaction, 2003 , MODERN WORLD HISTORY, Patterns of Interaction, 2003 How Grammar Works: A Self-Teaching Guide, To Kill A Mockingbird, Lord of the Flies, Romeo and Juliet, Fahrenheit 451,

AP World History (Advanced Placement)

2 semester elective usually taken in Grade 10, open to other grades.
This course is a survey of world history from pre-historic times to the present. Students will consider the following essential questions: “What can we learn about how to live from studying the past?” and “How does the past influence the present?” Students will do research, social studies skill development activities, analyze documents, write essays/essay circles, write DBQ essays (document based questions), give presentations, take tests/quizzes, and participate in discussions.
Texts: The Global Experience AP Edition,
Prerequisite: Administrator approval

Soc. St. 11: U.S. History

2 semesters
A survey of United States history from 1400’s to the present. Students will consider the following significant questions: “Who is my neighbor?”, “Why should Christians study history?”, and “What is the relationship between the development of American society and the ideals of democracy, individualism, capitalism, and Judeo-Christian values?” Students will give presentations, write essays, debate, discuss issues, read one novel (The Jungle) and take tests.
Text: The Americans Copyright 2005

AP U.S. History 11th grade

2 semesters
In addition to the normal U.S. History material, students will do outside reading, write essays from past AP tests, and discuss historical interpretations. Students will review two weeks before the AP test using study guides and practice tests. Major assessments include book reviews, essays, and document-based questions. Student Texts: American Pageant, 13th edition
Prerequisite: Administrator approval

Soc. St. 12: Global Issues

2nd semester Offered every year
A survey of contemporary issues and governmental systems. Students will consider the following significant questions: “How should Christians use wealth and power?”, How should Christians apply truth and justice to complex situations?”, and “Why is it important for Christians to be aware of cultures and issues around us?” Students will participate in an Senior Comprehensives, participate in a Senior Ministry trip, and participate in a wide variety of group activities including debates and discussions. Required Senior Course

Soc. St. 12: Japanese Culture First semester

Offered every year
An integrated study of Japanese culture and history (prehistoric to the present). Students will analyze Japanese cultural values and experience a variety of traditional art forms including wood block printing and kabuki. Students will consider the following significant questions: “How has my life in Japanese culture shaped who I am?”, “What does it mean to be a Christian in Japanese culture?”, and “What role will Japanese culture play in my future?” Students will travel to Nagasaki, write a reflection paper addressing Christianity in Japan, give presentations, read one novel (Silence), and interact with speakers. Required Senior Course

Science

Health

1 semester
The health program is designed to help students make informed and responsible choices about specific health behaviors and lifestyles. The course increases the student’s knowledge of health and first aid treatment. Students receive information about a variety of topics, including mental and emotional health stress and teen suicide; alcohol, tobacco, and drugs; sexually transmitted diseases; exercise and fitness; marriage and family; old age and dying; and an introduction to CPR. Required Course (Junior or Senior year)
Text: Prentice Hall "Health" 2007
This course ended June 2010.

Science 9: Physical Science

2 semesters
This course is an introduction to chemistry (the composition and properties of matter) and physics (the interrelations between matter and energy). Units covered include energy and motion, the nature of matter, kinds of substances, interactions of matter, waves (both light and sound), and electricity. The focus is on concept building through hands-on activities and demonstrations to provide the student with a strong foundation to build upon as he/she moves on to later science courses. Students will consider the following significant questions: What are our responsibilities to protect and maintain the resources God has given us? How do we evaluate the impact that science and technology have on society? How can we see God in the world around us? Required freshman course.
Text: Physical Science (Glencoe, 2002)

Science 10: Biology

2 semesters
This course covers topics of ecology, cell biology, and genetics; the five kingdom classification systems are studied ending with a look at God’s ultimate creation: humans. Students will consider the following significant questions: How can we see God’s creative power in the world around us? What are our responsibilities in the area of protecting and maintaining the resources God has given us? What are some aspects of genetics that have an impact on society? How do the organ systems of our bodies work together? Students will write a genetics report, complete a body system project, and do a newspaper article review. Required sophomore course.
Text: Biology: Dynamics of Life (Glencoe, 2002)

AP Biology (Advanced Placement) (grades 11-12)

Subject to Availability
2 semesters
This college-level course is taken semi-independently with students meeting together with the instructor every Monday evening. Material covers all the major areas of the science of biology and prepares the student for the AP Biology exam. Students will seek answers for the following questions: How can we see God’s creative power in the world around us? What are our responsibilities in the area of protecting and maintaining the resources God has given us? What are some aspects of science that have an impact on society? Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, and administrator approval.
Texts: Biology: The Science of Life (Harper Collins, 1991)

Chemistry (11th or 12th grade)

2 semesters
Chemisty is the study of the interaction of natural substances at the molecular and atomic level to produce many phsyical phenomena that humans observe in their daily lives. The course is designed to be as interactive, participative and motivational as possible. Students will be given ample opportunity to experiment and use chemical substances, and challenged to link experimental observations to theoretical facts. Prerequisites: Physical Science, Biology, and Algebra II.
Text: Chemistry Matter and Change (Glencoe McGraw-Hill), teacher supplied notes

AP Chemistry (Advanced Placement) may be offered some years for 11th or 12th grades

2 semesters
The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. For some students, this course enables them to undertake, in their first year, second-year work in the chemistry sequence at their institution or to register in courses in other fields where general chemistry is a prerequisite. For other students, the AP Chemistry course fulfills the laboratory science requirement and frees time for other courses.
AP Chemistry strives to meet the objectives of a good college general chemistry course. Students in such a course are expected to attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. The course should contribute to the development of the students’ abilities to think clearly and to express their ideas, orally and in writing, with clarity and logic.
The AP Chemistry course is designed to be taken only after the successful completion of a first course in high school chemistry. Surveys of students who take the AP Chemistry Exam indicate that the probability of achieving a grade of 3 or higher is significantly greater for students who successfully complete a first course in high school chemistry prior to undertaking the AP course. Thus it is strongly recommended that credit in a first-year high school chemistry course be a prerequisite for enrollment in an AP Chemistry class. In addition, the recommended mathematics prerequisite for an AP Chemistry class is the successful completion of Advanced Algebra

AP Physics (Grades 11 or 12)

2 semesters
This is a college-level physics course which covers topics in classical mechanics, thermodynamics, optics, electricity and magnetism, nuclear and quantum physics. Concurrent enrollment in a higher-level math course is encouraged. Students are challenged to consider the following questions: How can we see God’s creative power in the world around us? What are our responsibilities in the area of protecting and maintaining the resources God has given us?, What are some aspects of science that have an impact on society?
Students who complete the course should be adequately prepared for the Advanced placement Physics B exam.
Entry skills / Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra. Enrollment in a higher-level math course is recommended.
Texts: Contemporary College Physics (Merrill, 1993

Physics (Grades 11 or 12)

2 Semesters
This is a non-AP high school physics course which covers concepts in classical mechanics, thermodynamics, optics, electricity and magnetism, nuclear and quantum physics. Concurrent enrollment in a math course is encouraged. Students are challenged to consider the following questions: How can we see God’s creative power in the world around us? What are our responsibilities in the area of protecting and maintaining the resources God has given us?, What are some aspects of science that have an impact on society?
Students can take the AP Physics course the following year if they choose to.
Entry skills / Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra. Enrollment in a higher-level math course is recommended.
Texts: Physics: Principles and Problems (Glencoe, 2005)

World Languages

French 

French I 2 semesters
In French I, students attain proficiency in the four basic skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing within the context of contemporary French language and culture. The majority of the activities have youth related themes such as hobbies, money, travel, school-work, career choices, friendships, and relationships with parents. Knowledge of grammatical structure and sentence patterns are included.
Texts: Initial 1 (CLE), Communication (CLE))

French II 2 semesters
French II is a review and continuation of first year conversation and grammar. The course includes a comparative study of the geographic, ethnic, and cultural variety of the French-speaking world in Europe.
Prerequisite: French 1
Texts: Initial 2, SAT Barrons, Grammaire (CLE). Prerequisite: French I

French III Honors 2 semesters
French Honors is designed to develop student proficiency in French through the integration of the four communication skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing). There is a strong emphasis on French culture through the study for popular French literary works. The course is conducted in French and emphasizes the use of French for active communication. Honors French will also prepare students for the SAT II language examination.

Japanese

Japanese I 2 semesters
Every year Japanese I focuses on the four basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing with the emphasis on Japanese daily culture. This course is intended for students with little or no previous knowledge of Japanese. Hiragana, katakana, and kanji (50) are taught in the context of the cultural content the student is learning. Students will study greetings, self-introductions, shopping, food and drink, family, daily routines and school.

Japanese II 2 semesters
Every year Japanese II reviews and continues conversation and focuses on complex grammar, mastering the verb and adjective forms. Cultural studies are emphasized in speech/presentation, project, writing assignments. This course is intended for students who have taken Japanese I or have a similar competency level. Prerequisite: Japanese 1. Students need to have mastered hiragana and katakana in reading and writing.

Japanese III 2 semesters
Every year Japanese III reviews and continues conversation and focuses on complex grammar, reading, listening, and writing simple compositions. Cultural studies are emphasized in speech/presentation and project besides composition. The course emphasizes the use of Japanese for active communication. Prerequisite: Japanese II

Japanese IV 2 semesters
Every year Japanese IV focuses on refining the four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing to prepare for going to the AP Japanese course. Students study grammar and practice oral and writing skills with new vocabulary and kanji, do presentations and projects and write compositions. Prerequisite: Japanese III

AP Japanese 2 semesters
Every year AP Japanese is designed to develop students’ proficiency in Japanese through the integration of the four communication skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing). Students are expected to be self-motivated and are prepared to take the AP Japanese Language and Culture Exam. The course is conducted entirely in Japanese. In addition to studying kanji and increasing reading comprehension, students will express their thoughts through compositions, presentations and projects. In order to enhance their knowledge about Japanese culture, class materials include articles, brochures, advertisements, videos/DVDs, websites and supplementary books. Prerequisite: Japanese IV

Spanish

Spanish I 2 semesters
Spanish I is an introduction to the four basic skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students begin writing short compositions within the first nine weeks. Cultural studies of Spanish speaking countries are woven throughout the curriculum. Religious vocabulary is increased through the use of Spanish Bible texts for devotions and the memorization of Bible verses in Spanish.

Spanish II 2 semesters
Spanish II reviews and continues conversation, complex grammar, and advanced reading, listening, and writing assignments. Cultural studies continue to be woven throughout the curriculum. Students will begin giving short speeches in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish I.

Spanish III Honors 2 semesters
Spanish Honors/III reviews and continues conversation, advanced grammar, reading, listening, and writing. Cultural studies are presented with each unit emphasizing a different geographical area of the Hispanic world. Literature for each unit is also presented. Students give longer speeches in Spanish. The course also teaches to the Spanish SAT which students should be prepared to take in November.


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